FAMOUS FIVE: Goalscoring City subs

Shaun Maloney scored a crucial goal for City after coming on as a sub at the weekend. Obviously, loads of City subs have scored goals, but some were more memorable than others – indeed, we’ve had to leave a couple of truly heroic ones out (we’re offering apologies to you Stuart Elliott). Anyway, have these five on us…

1: Ray Henderson, 1965

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Substitutes were introduced for the start of the 1965/66 season, though only in league football, and were strictly limited to injuries only. Henderson was an established inside forward for City for much of the early 60s but by the time the 1965/66 season started, he was only on the bench. It took three games for him to be introduced, as a replacement for injured left back Dennis Butler, and he scored in a 2-1 win at Brighton.

So City’s two substitution firsts happened in the same game. It initially didn’t help Henderson, who still didn’t feature in the next four matches but after a 4-1 defeat at York, he was put on the right wing and never looked back, completing the front five of unprecedented repute that scored exactly 100 of City’s 109 goals that ended in the Third Division title.

2: Dean Windass, 2008

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Nothing makes a manager look good quite like an instant goal from a substitute, and when Phil Brown brought on Dean Windass to replace Caleb Folan at Barnsley in April 2008, City were comfortably 2-0 up with eight minutes left. Within seconds, the 39 year old icon had steered in a low left foot shot in front of a delirious Tiger Nation happily getting soaked in a packed away end.

Picking Windass in this context feels a tad harsh, as Folan scored priceless goals from the bench against Coventry, Blackpool, Leicester and Watford (twice – here and here) in that promotion season alone, and then did likewise against Fulham in the opening Premier League game the following August. But, well, he’s Deano, and his goal capped a really wonderful night for the team.

3: Stephen Quinn, 2014

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Three minutes after coming on as a sub at Wembley against his former club Sheffield United, the flame-haired midfielder got on the end of a cross to nod home City’s fourth of the FA Cup semi-final of 2014 and just about confirm City’s place in the final.

Quinn didn’t celebrate the goal, but it didn’t matter, as plenty did. That his former club still got back to 4-3 and took it to past the 90th minute before finally giving up the ghost probably made him feel a bit easier about it, along with his manager deciding, belatedly, he was better for being in the team and giving him a free role in the final, in which he excelled.

4: Frankie Bunn, 1985

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It took a tad more than 20 years since the 12th man was introduced to league football for a City sub to score twice in a game. The occasion couldn’t have been any lower in profile, however – City’s first ever match in the Full Members Cup, introduced for the 1985/6 season to fill gaps in the footballing calendar for teams in the top two divisions following the post-Heysel ban from European competition.

City were in the inaugural competition following promotion under Brian Horton the previous season, and Bunn was a close-season signing from Horton’s old club Luton. He settled in quickly, scoring on his debut and putting away six goals by the first day of October. He managed a brace after replacing Andy Flounders in the second half as City comfortably overcame Bradford 4-1 in the new competition, following it up with goals in the next two rounds, though City went out in the process after losing the northern final on aggregate to Manchester City.

Bunn ended the campaign with 20 goals in all competitions but only got five the next season, so in 1987/88 he became an undeserving boo-boy target (despite five goals in the first 11 games) and Horton impetuously sold him to Oldham, where his goalscoring feats took him into the record books.

5: Andy Payton and Ian McParland, 1989

From 1-0 up to 2-1 down, and then your two substitutions pay off handsomely…

This was Stan Ternent’s first game in charge. He was, after just 90 minutes of football, clearly a genius.

3 replies
  1. Matt
    Matt says:

    Fettis was indeed left out because his achievements were documented in last week’s Famous Five.

    As for Holme, he scored 11 goals in the 1972/3 season but only two were as a sub. He may have been a much-used substitute during that period and earned a favourable reputation for it, but this specifically is about goalscoring exploits by substitutes.

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